Y is for Yerbua – #AtoZChallenge – 2017 – Uintan Mammals

Y is for Yerbua

Yerbua is a genus of hopping rodent. The name “Yerbua” was coined in 1778, but has since been replaced with “Pedetes.” I have this name written down as a Uintan mammal, but Pedetes is a modern taxon from Africa, so I’m not sure what happened. But here you go:

Spring Hare, Pedetes capensis. Credit: Bernard DuPont CC 2.0 By-SA

X is for Xylotitan – #AtoZChallenge – 2017 – Uintan Mammals

X is for Xylotitan

Xylotitan is a new species of brotothere, a hoofed mammal related to horses and rhinos. Brototheres were giant mammals, considered the earliest of the ‘megaherbivores.’

Among brototheres, Xylotitan is among the smallest, only about the size of a large tapir.

This new species was named in 2016 by Mihlbachler and Samuels.

V is for Viverravus – #AtoZChallenge – 2017 – Uintan Mammals

V is for Viverravus

Viverravus is a carnivorous mammal. Interestingly, I have written up Viverravus in an earlier A to Z Challenge about Paleocene mammals, here. Viverravus as a genus lasted many millions of years.

Here is an early Eocene Viverravus from the Yale-Peabody Museum:

Viverravus sp. YPM VPPU 022652. right ramus with P/4, M/1

U is for Uintatherium – #AtoZChallenge – 2017 – Uintan Mammals

U is for Uintatherium

Uintatherium was a massive hoofed mammal that lived during the Eocene epoch. Superficially, they were rather rhinoceros-like, though they were not related.

A reconstruction of Uintatherium.
Credit: Dmitry Bogdanov CC 3.0 By SA

Notably, Uintatheres had many horns and protuberances on their skulls, in addition to robust tusks.

Cast of Uintatherium anceps (Leidy, 1872) – syn. Dinoceras mirabile (Marsh 1872) skull, neck vertebrae.
Credit: Jebulon [Public Domain]